RIIIIIINNNNNGGGG!!!!!  I jolted awake.  Heart pounding.  It was the dead of the night, fumbling around to find the phone.  I was confused.  I could not remember where I was.  RIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNGGGGG!!!!!  Looking.  Oh, there, I see a flash of light and now I know I am in a hotel room.  In Hawaii.  The phone is across the room on a table.

What could it be?  Who is calling?  It is Midnight.  I stumble across the carpet and I grab the phone and slide the bar across to answer it.  "HELLO!" I say quickly...

"Erin!!!" My mother sounded anxious...."Molly won't talk!  She can't talk..."

My heart pounding, trying to find the words..."What do you mean?!?!  Why isn't she talking?"

"I don't know..."  I hear a giggle.  Not funny.  It was a creepy sounding giggle.  Megan is yelling in the background, "MOLLY!  MOLLY!"  That giggle sound was Molly uttering a sound.  "Her hand is twisted.  Her face is half up half down.  She is just starring straight.  She won't talk.  Just giggles.  What do we do, Erin?"

I started to sink fast, heart racing, my eyes wide open with a desire to climb through that phone and hold my baby.  Tell her it is okay, but I was thousands of miles away, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.  Even if I got on a plane that second, it would be 15 hours until I would be home.  As my heart was being squeezed, I cried out, "Let me talk to her!!!"  They started to scramble around and then I heard her utter that crazy giggle.  It was now louder.  I heard her say something.  "MINEEEYYYY"  It did not make sense at all!  I leaned close to the phone as if closer to her, and I calmly said, "Molly.  This is mom!  I am here!  I love you!  Talk to me!"  I started to get frantic.  No response.  "MOLLLLLLLYYYYY!!!!! Answer me!  Can you hear me????!"  Still no response.

My mother, who flew to Tennessee to care for our children while we went on our very first trip far away alone, was a nurse.  She knows what to do in emergency situations, yet she said after grabbing the phone back to place on her ear, "Erin!"  I quickly ask, "What is her blood sugar???!"  She returns, "The meter is wrong.  It says 380 then 200.  Then it will say 80, then back to 350.  I have no idea what her blood sugar is!  I don't know what to do!!!!!  What do I do, ERIN????!!!!!"  I look over to my husband who is trying to calm everyone down.  He is trying to tell me something.  I can't hear him.  It all feels like a dream and he is just not making sense either.  No one is making sense.  He is asking me and I am trying my hardest to answer him.  I tell him a list of numbers that does not make sense to him either.

"Call 911, NOW!" I yell into the phone.  "NOW!"  I hang up the phone.  I run to the bathroom, looking down on the marble floors and I realize there is NOTHING, NOTHING I can do to help.  I am helpless.  I cry.  The tears roll down my face and I don't want to call them because I don't want to interrupt her only line of help in this world, in this natural world.  I cry out to the only lifeline I know.  I cry out to God!!!  I beg for her life.  I beg for his will.  I beg that I can accept that will whatever it may be.  I pray for the ambulance to get there, fast.  "Please, God be with my daughter.  Get her the help she needs!"   I go to my husband arms.  He starts to pray out loud.  We both feel helpless.  So much in need of mercy.  Of a miracle.  Our daughter's life hanging there in balance.

You put your faith on that little machine.  It is supposed to tell you what your blood sugar is.  We never thought that could happen.  Why?  I can't even imagine how at this point.  Usually if her sugars go low, we give her a snack and she snaps out of it.  BUT, Listen, listen close...if that meter says 380, you have to give her a shot of insulin.  WHAT.  IF.  IT.  IS.  WRONG?   What if, that day before, I imagine, it was wrong, what if it said 380 and she was really 80-100 which is normal?  She is a good girl.  A responsible girl.  And my mom told me her numbers were all wacky and we chalked it off as her body fighting a cold.  We never thought this was possible.  And then when you give a shot of this insulin when it is not needed.  Hello! That is deadly!  It is a miracle she is alive.

I get on my laptop.  I start begging others to also pray!  It is 5:30 am on the mainland.  Lots of prayer is going up.  People from all over the world, praying, begging God with me!  A peace like a river washed over me.  She was in God's hands now!

The phone rings, "Erin!  How far away is the ambulance?  Will it be a long time?"  I said, "I don't know!  I can't tell where they come out of...I never called 911.  We never had this happen!"  My mother returns, "You live way out in the middle of no where! That is not good!"  Just as she said that, a vehicle drove into the gravel round drive.  Two ladies come running for the door and they let them in.  They rush over to my listless daughter.  I can hear them asking questions to Molly.  No answer.  My mom is telling them the story about he meter.  They grab a meter and start testing.  It is low!  Just as we thought, but could not be sure with that broken meter.

They are given her something to try to get her sugar up as the ambulance arrives.  She is put into the ambulance and brought to the nearest ER where they can't help her, she is still not responding correctly.  She is now conscious yet does not know simple answer to questions.  They worry and do a CAT scan.  Then they put her back into the ambulance and ship her down to the largest hospital, in Nashville.  There they have diabetes specialists and neurologists to try to get to the bottom of this seizure.

After about 12 hours of sitting in the ER, they still did not have answers for us.  By that time, Molly was talking and responding.  She had a splitting head ache, but she was stable.  Praise God!
It was a long day for her, a long night for Mark and I, yet we were in paradise.  Lost in paradise.  The day was a blur, just waiting for news, walking on the beach, praying, trying to find options of getting home sooner.  Phone clenched in hand.  Mark drove us to the other side of the island just to think and pray.  We were in the jungle and listening to the waves crash on the shore.  It is that moment when you realize that God is in control.  You know that no matter where you are in this vast earth, He is still in control.  There is nothing to fear!

"Fear not: for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine.
When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee."
Isaiah 43:1-2

 

This was not something we ever did.  We NEVER left Molly for years.  When she had issues years ago, I had a bed next to mine so I could monitor her all night.  I never knew what her sugars would do.  Diabetes is not something that just goes away.  It is always there and you can't run from it.  This past year I gained confidence in the fact that she became completely stable and her condition had completely improved.  BUT I am humbled by the fact that this is still a disease.  Things can still happen.  Look.  The Meter broke.  What are the chances of that?!  That is not normal.  Nor something anyone could see coming!

Here is the problem...Molly has a problem sensing her blood sugars when they drop or sky rocket.  I often times will see her just acting tired and ask her to test.  Her sugar will be below 60!  And she never felt it.  The damage was already done to her brain.  Over time this can be very serious.  It is called Hypoglycemic Unawareness.  Most diabetics can tell when they are dropping and they are able to check and correct.  Molly can't.  I can't tell either.  That is a very serious issue!

So now what?!

We are on a waiting list for a service dog for our daughter.  Do you think I will ever trust in those little machines again?  NOPE!  It is not out of a lack of faith in God.  It is out of prayer and using wisdom that we came to this decision together as an entire family.  The Diabetic Alert dogs are specifically trained for 8 months continually to have the sole purpose of alerting people when there is a sudden change in the glucose levels, whether it be going in a direction that is high or low.

Every time a diabetic goes low, it damages the brain.  And the damages are long lasting.  It can be life threatening if not treated, like in Molly's recent situation.  If the sugars are too high, it causes damage to her vital organs.  It is like shards of glass running through her blood stream, cutting everything in its path.  The dog actually alerts the person before it gets into a dangerous level.  Alerting them before there is any sort of damage to their body!

For example.  If my daughter went to bed at 100 and it started to slowly go down, she would not know.  I would not be able to hear it going too low or see any difference on her face.  BUT, the alert dog would SMELL this change already at 80 which is still in the safe zone.  The dog is trained to hop up on the bed and jostle her awake, bark, move her around until she wakes up and then it will give her her tester unit to check, but she already knows it is low.  If the meter is broken, she still knows that the dog is accurate with its nose.  The dog will go to the kitchen and will fetch her something to treat the low.  If she would not wake, it will go to the next person and alert them.  If no one would be around, the dog is trained to call 911 with a special button.

My daughter is 16 years old this week and with that age comes the need for some independence.  How could I allow her to say, drive in a car alone to run a errand, or go to a job, when she can't sense a low coming on?  She could be driving down the road, get confused, lost, or drift off the road.  With the dog being with her at all times, she will know that she is dropping sugar levels, and she can pull over, check, because that dog will not leave her alone until she does.  She can treat the low, get back on the road and keep going.  All is safe!

If she would get married down the road when she is older, Lord willing, this would also be vital.  What happens when her husband would leave for work?  If the dog is there, she can feel safe that the dog will help her stay in a safe zone for her sugars.  It is just a great extra measure of precaution.  God is good!

 

Just for a reminder…

Tea Time Talk Show Tuesday Upcoming Schedule:

Tuesday, May 1, 2018  at 10 am CST will feature Co-Host Owen Newman

  • The following Tuesday will be featuring Owen Newman from the hills of TN talking about homesteading and the simple life.  He has a lot of wisdom and experience living with less and making the most of each and every resource they are given.  If you have any specific questions, please leave a comment below or send us an email or message on facebook from the keeper of the homestead page.  

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0 thoughts on “Nightmare in Paradise

  1. Just a thought, maybe God has already provided for this. I’ve seen you posting about how much money you are making with Plexus. I often find that the Lord provides for needs I don’t know about yet in just this way.
    Praying for your family!

    • We have been very blessed by our income. It is a making us a living, yet my husband is back working to also try to bring in more. $15,000 is still beyond our reach. We don’t have it. I wish we did, I would not have asked if that were the case since I am an honest woman with integrity. Thank you for your prayers! They are much needed. Hopefully people will still see our sincere need even after your comment, it is never safe to assume things. But I hope at some point our income will be enough someday, I pray, that without thought, when another person is in need, we will be the ones who will be able to give abundantly. That is our goal!

  2. Oh Erin I’m so sorry! How terrifying and how helpless you must have felt. Isn’t that just how it is – you finally go away and then something horrible happens? My youngest daughter lived 17 mos. and I often had to hook her up to a pulse ox to check her heart. I had TWO! And usually neither one agreed with each other. Very stressful. These machines are so helpful yet can make us crazy too. I’m sure that wonderful dog will be much more reliable! I will be praying you get enough money to buy the dog. (I hope to donate in a few days.) Praying for you all!

  3. Praying for you all. We’ve had some scary times when our son’s tester failed too, I can’t imagine going through this though. I feel sick just hearing it. We’re gladly giving to help with this need.

  4. I will be praying for your precious daughter and funds for the dog. I feel that it is good to have multiple tools at hand. Have a few metres, replacement batteries and get them calibrated regularly. My blood sugars have never been so low as your daughter but from personal e produce I know that over time I don’t seem to sense a hypo until I’m quite low. Blessings to your family.

  5. I’m praying for you and your daughter. I don’t believe the meter is broken. I’m a diabetic and my dog is a diabetic (we both test several times a day) I’m on an insulin pump. My diabetes will never be cured because the gene that controls my insulin is messed up. The reason I believe it wasn’t broken is first your mom was panicky and didn’t know what to do which is common. My husband gets panicky and Forgets steps and fumbles it happens to everyone even nurses. I know your moms a nurse but I have had nurses as recently as a month ago use the meter incorrectly or wipe the finger correctly. The technology is constantly changing. If she poked her with unclean fingers (both hers and your daughters the numbers will be all over the place). There could of been residue which you can’t see or sometimes smell that is on the hands. If your moms hands or daughters hands were not cleaned throughly with soap and water and/or alcohol wipes that majorly affects numbers. Sometimes I have tested and my number is way high or way low and it’s usually because my finger wasn’t clean enough. I test 3x making sure I get around the same number twice (+ or – 10) Make sure the finger is dry (air dry) because alcohol will affect BG numbers. Luckily alcohol evaporates quickly. I have packets of alcohol wipes in my case and use them all the time and wash my hands for an accurate reading. Any residue of food, even lotion, etc can interfere with the reading. So after cleaning nothing should be applied to the hands until after. To check to make sure the meter is accurate use the control solution and also check to make sure her meter is calibrated (coded) to her strips which is the 2 digit number on the side of the strips bottle. To use the solution put a strip in and when it ask for the blood put a drop of solution. On the control solution bottle there will be a number and that should match the meter if it doesn’t the strips may be bad (they expire or can get damaged). I remember a while back freestyle test strips were recalled because they were giving inaccurate readings. So again it’s the strips not the meter. Try another strip from the same bottle and if it still not matching open a new strip bottle and do the control solution again. Most meters calibrate or code automatically and some do not. Meters rarely break and usually it’s users error or test strips. I have used them for over 12 years and the meter I use is connected to my insulin pump wirelessly so I have to trust my meter since I continuously get insulin. So if her reading is wonky check the calibration (code) then use the control solution. If the meter has the right reading for the control solution and coded correctly then the meter is fine and test strips are good. Also I wouldn’t let your daughter go to sleep with BG at a 100. My endocrinologist wants me around 120 so I have wiggle room. Her risk of dropping is greater. It’s better to be a little high than low. Once you go low it goes fast. Get her in the habit of waking up at certain hours to test. She needs to learn to do this on her own because one day she will have to. It’s a pain but once she sees the pattern of her BG Levels through the night she can cut back and adjust. But she needs to be consitant with her diet, exercise, sleep. I have dawn phenomeon and my sugars raise at night. You also stated you use a number of different meters which is not good also. 2 meters the most. It’s better for her endocrinologist to get accurate readings when downloading from her meter. Most meters can download and the endocrinologist can see her levels on a graph and make sure she has good curves of readings. She doesn’t want to be jumping all over the place which is not good. Plus the risk of error is reduced since meters take different strips and code differently. I don’t know if you looked into getting a continuous glucose meter. Dexcom and Medtronic have one and a lot less than a service dog. Most insurance covers it. She puts in on the stomach area usually and glucose sensor reads her BG continuously. The meter than alerts when the sugars are raising to high or dropping. When you get an alert then you have to finger prick for a more precise reading. Here’s a website that explains it http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/treatments/continuous-glucose-monitoring. You also said she is desensitized from knowing what her sugars are. Well then she needs to test every 4 hours and before and after every meal and at bedtime, throughout the night and first thing in the morning. I tested 15 times a day for over 2 years but now I’m down to 12. She will be able to reduce it when she understands how her BGs run and how she feels. She needs to keep a journal and write down after checking her BG how she feels. This will help her notice what she feels like at certain levels. She will develop an awareness. I became desensitized also so now when I yawn, feel fatigued, lazy and unmotivated, get grumpy, or irritable, not hungry and nauseated at all I c

  6. Not sure if my last post went through so I’m sending again.
    I’m praying for you and your daughter. I don’t believe the meter is broken. I’m a diabetic and my dog is a diabetic (we both test several times a day) I’m on an insulin pump. My diabetes will never be cured because the gene that controls my insulin is messed up. The reason I believe it wasn’t broken is first your mom was panicky and didn’t know what to do which is common. My husband gets panicky and Forgets steps and fumbles it happens to everyone even nurses. I know your moms a nurse but I have had nurses as recently as a month ago use the meter incorrectly or wipe the finger correctly. The technology is constantly changing. If she poked her with unclean fingers (both hers and your daughters the numbers will be all over the place). There could of been residue which you can’t see or sometimes smell that is on the hands. If your moms hands or daughters hands were not cleaned throughly with soap and water and/or alcohol wipes that majorly affects numbers. Sometimes I have tested and my number is way high or way low and it’s usually because my finger wasn’t clean enough. I test 3x making sure I get around the same number twice (+ or – 10) Make sure the finger is dry (air dry) because alcohol will affect BG numbers. Luckily alcohol evaporates quickly. I have packets of alcohol wipes in my case and use them all the time and wash my hands for an accurate reading. Any residue of food, even lotion, etc can interfere with the reading. So after cleaning nothing should be applied to the hands until after. To check to make sure the meter is accurate use the control solution and also check to make sure her meter is calibrated (coded) to her strips which is the 2 digit number on the side of the strips bottle. To use the solution put a strip in and when it ask for the blood put a drop of solution. On the control solution bottle there will be a number and that should match the meter if it doesn’t the strips may be bad (they expire or can get damaged). I remember a while back freestyle test strips were recalled because they were giving inaccurate readings. So again it’s the strips not the meter. Try another strip from the same bottle and if it still not matching open a new strip bottle and do the control solution again. Most meters calibrate or code automatically and some do not. Meters rarely break and usually it’s users error or test strips. I have used them for over 12 years and the meter I use is connected to my insulin pump wirelessly so I have to trust my meter since I continuously get insulin. So if her reading is wonky check the calibration (code) then use the control solution. If the meter has the right reading for the control solution and coded correctly then the meter is fine and test strips are good. Also I wouldn’t let your daughter go to sleep with BG at a 100. My endocrinologist wants me around 120 so I have wiggle room. Her risk of dropping is greater. It’s better to be a little high than low. Once you go low it goes fast. Get her in the habit of waking up at certain hours to test. She needs to learn to do this on her own because one day she will have to. It’s a pain but once she sees the pattern of her BG Levels through the night she can cut back and adjust. But she needs to be consitant with her diet, exercise, sleep. I have dawn phenomeon and my sugars raise at night. You also stated you use a number of different meters which is not good also. 2 meters the most. It’s better for her endocrinologist to get accurate readings when downloading from her meter. Most meters can download and the endocrinologist can see her levels on a graph and make sure she has good curves of readings. She doesn’t want to be jumping all over the place which is not good. Plus the risk of error is reduced since meters take different strips and code differently. I don’t know if you looked into getting a continuous glucose meter. Dexcom and Medtronic have one and a lot less than a service dog. Most insurance covers it. She puts in on the stomach area usually and glucose sensor reads her BG continuously. The meter than alerts when the sugars are raising to high or dropping. When you get an alert then you have to finger prick for a more precise reading. Here’s a website that explains it http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/treatments/continuous-glucose-monitoring. You also said she is desensitized from knowing what her sugars are. Well then she needs to test every 4 hours and before and after every meal and at bedtime, throughout the night and first thing in the morning. I tested 15 times a day for over 2 years but now I’m down to 12. She will be able to reduce it when she understands how her BGs run and how she feels. She needs to keep a journal and write down after checking her BG how she feels. This will help her notice what she feels like at certain levels. She will develop an awareness. I became desensitized also so now when I yawn, feel fatigued, lazy and unmotivated,

  7. I’m praying for you and your daughter. I don’t believe the meter is broken. I have been a diabetic for over 10 years and my dog is a diabetic for 3years and we both test several times a day. I’m on an insulin pump. My diabetes is monogenic and will never be cured because the gene that controls my insulin is messed up. So I know about diabetes and was concerned about some statements you made and maybe I can help.
    The reason I believe it wasn’t broken is first your mom was panicky and didn’t know what to do which is common. My husband gets panicky and Forgets steps and fumbles it happens to everyone even nurses. I know your moms a nurse but I have had nurses as recently as a month ago use the meter incorrectly or wipe the finger incorrectly. The technology is constantly changing and many do not get training to keep updated. I had to show the nurse what to do.

  8. Me and my Husband took in a former service Dog wich was to be put down because her was 8 years old. Apparently to old to be of Use anymore. My heart broke, be was healthy and good. Please, let your dog die in Peace When his Time comes.

  9. Continuation: Cut off rest of post
    This will help her notice what she feels like at certain levels. She will develop an awareness. I became desensitized also so now when I yawn, feel fatigued, lazy and unmotivated, get grumpy, or irritable, not hungry and nauseated at all I check. Usually I’m high. When my head starts to feel lightheaded, spacey, tingly hands, really hungry or thirsty or moody even just a little I check. I’m getting low. It’s noticing the first signs and that’s why you need to constantly check BG so you can become aware.
    I know your praying for this service dog but I stress to you this dog doesn’t replace the meter at all. Yes the dog can detect but she won’t accurately know how low or high she is. Her meter will be her lifesaver. She won’t know how much insulin to take or if she needs her glucose shot or just juice or candy. Plus you have to recheck at least 15-20 min after and I check hourly after that for 2 hours. There also finding that dogs can give a false reading especially is she had a high or low and is wearing the same clothes. The smell is on the clothes stronger than before. The dog will give a false alert. Make sure you get a service dog at a reputable place. Unfortunately there’s no standard procedure of training and some trainers have unstudied, unproven ideas on how they train the dog. The article link clearly explains tht plus a study that they did. Here’s another article which explains why. A very good read http://blog.smartanimaltraining.com/2015/10/14/can-diabetes-alert-dogs-really-detect-low-glucose-levels/.
    Most of all I stress to you don’t live your lives in constant panick or bubble. Yes she’s going to have highs and lows which are a part of a diabetic life. Some will be scary and some very minor. Even well controlled numbers go wonky especially when sick because cold medicines have glucose in it which affects BG. Even when she gets them it’s not the end of the world. It’s when she doesn’t treat it correctly is when it’s bad. Technology has gone far with diabetes. My insulin pump is wireless (I have the Omni pod system). I have used them for over 10 years. My current meter which is part of the Omni pod system I have had for over 5 years and never used another meter. I have had weird readings and it’s because of user error. My tests strips were bad or my fingers were not clean enough. I survived 2 pregnancys with great control and I learned everything I could about how to control my sugars. But panick causes stress, stress causes your sugars to go haywire. Many people live full happy lives as a diabetic even type ones. I had a friend from high school that is type one and he basically didn’t care about his diabetes and was a constant roller coaster with his BG. He is still alive today and no damage but he also shaped up after high school also. But those years in high school luckily did no damage.
    So remember when your daughter is acting weird first take a deep breath and relax. You don’t need to rush. You wNt to do this right and taking an extra minute won’t hurt her. Calmly get her meter then go wash YOUR hands. If you rush you more than likely to fumble or forget a procedure. Plus the calmer you are the calmer she and everyone else will be. If she is able Wash her hands and you can test her in the bathroom. If she’s not able get an alcohol wipe and wipe every finger and inside of her hand well. I wouldn’t recommend alcohol on a cotton ball since the cotton is not sterile. Individual wipes is better and sterile. Make sure her needle (lancet) is new. Replace her needle (lancet) especially after highs and lows since blood does get on the needle (lancet). Warm hands produce better results because of blood flow so you don’t have to squeeze. So if you can before you clean her hands run under warm water or have a warm rag. Then calmly put the strip in the tester and wait for it to calibrate and give you the go ahead. Get a sample of her blood and wait for the reading. I would test her two times also just to get a more precise reading. Like I said stress causes BG to fluctuate. Make sure she has a glucose pen handy when she can’t get to sugar right away or about ready to pass out. Especially if she is passed out then use it.
    I know what it feels like to not know what her BG are. My dog is diabetic. His pancreas is shut down. Unfortunately the only technology for dogs is a meter. Since he can’t talk I have to look for visual cues that he is too low or high. This last week my dogs sugars went down to 26. Very very bad. I didn’t realize he was low because he was napping. I realized when I had a hard time keeping him awake he was low. Getting BGs from a dog is difficult and you can’t panicbecause then the dog panics. There’s only a few places to get there BGs. Inside there lip (my dog will have none of that), the ear which is the one we do but it’s hard to catch a vein, or the elbow which is very difficult because of the tough skin. I had to poke him 4x to get any blood f

  10. Continuation :
    You also stated you use a number of different meters which is not good also. 2 meters the most. It’s better for her endocrinologist to get accurate readings when downloading from her meter. Most meters can download and the endocrinologist can see her levels on a graph and make sure she has good curves of readings. She doesn’t want to be jumping all over the place which is not good. Plus the risk of error is reduced since meters take different strips and code differently. I don’t know if you looked into getting a continuous glucose meter. Dexcom and Medtronic have one and a lot less than a service dog. Most insurance covers it. She puts in on the stomach area usually and glucose sensor reads her BG continuously. The meter than alerts when the sugars are raising to high or dropping. When you get an alert then you have to finger prick for a more precise reading. Here’s a website that explains it http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/treatments/continuous-glucose-monitoring. You also said she is desensitized from knowing what her sugars are. Well then she needs to test every 4 hours and before and after every meal and at bedtime, throughout the night and first thing in the morning. I tested 15 times a day for over 2 years but now I’m down to 12. She will be able to reduce it when she understands how her BGs run and how she feels. She needs to keep a journal and write down after checking her BG how she feels. This will help her notice what she feels like at certain levels. She will develop an awareness. I became desensitized also so now when I yawn, feel fatigued, lazy and unmotivated, get grumpy, or irritable, not hungry and nauseated at all I check. Usually I’m high. When my head starts to feel lightheaded, spacey, tingly hands, really hungry or thirsty or moody even just a little I check. I’m getting low. It’s noticing the first signs and that’s why you need to constantly check BG so you can become aware.
    I know your praying for this service dog but I stress to you this dog doesn’t replace the meter at all. Yes the dog can detect but she won’t accurately know how low or high she is. Her meter will be her lifesaver. She won’t know how much insulin to take or if she needs her glucose shot or just juice or candy. Plus you have to recheck at least 15-20 min after and I check hourly after that for 2 hours. There also finding that dogs can give a false reading especially is she had a high or low and is wearing the same clothes. The smell is on the clothes stronger than before. The dog will give a false alert. Make sure you get a service dog at a reputable place. Unfortunately there’s no standard procedure of training and some trainers have unstudied, unproven ideas on how they train the dog. The article link clearly explains tht plus a study that they did. Here’s another article which explains why. A very good read http://blog.smartanimaltraining.com/2015/10/14/can-diabetes-alert-dogs-really-detect-low-glucose-levels/.

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